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Saturday, 14 July 2012

Cut Roof On A Porch

In the UK we describe a cut roof as one you build from scratch, not using preformed trusses. These tend to be the roofs I end up doing and it's funny when I've spoke to other carpenters who avoid them.
Getting the first four rafters up and the ridge is normally the tricky bit
This week another carpenter and myself have put a cut roof on a rather large porch, it has quite a good pitch (40 degrees) and a wide overhang to allow for the stone work that needs to be built up under it.
Ceiling collars added to give the roof that triangulation it needs for strenght

Starting a roof like this is the hard bit, working out the angles, cuts and lenghs. We used a ready reckoner on this roof (a book with tables of values for different pitches), each working it out separately and making sure we arrived at the same answer (we did!). Getting the first four rafters up with the ridge is normally tricky (you could each do with three hand to fix and hold everything). This is the point where you need to make sure all your cuts are spot on before you cut everything else.



Front view of the framed out roof


Side view showing the gable ladder on the front to be supported by the stone work

Picture showing the eaves with soffit added and fasica but barge board still to go on
Once all the rafters were up we added the ceiling collars to strengthen it then work on cutting the rafters to the right overhang and adding a "ladder" to the front to carry the barge board past the stone work that's to go up.
Not bad for under two days work but still a bit left to finish off next week.

12 comments:

  1. I find your blog absolutely fascinating, seeing how everything is done, wish we had a carpenter like you around here! I found the article on the lean-to roof very interesting, you are taking the mystery out of carpentry! The cut roof porch job looks wonderful. Silly question maybe, but are the first rafters, the ones next to the house wall fixed to the wall first, as you're building the first bit of the frame, or are they fixed afterwards? (or not at all? Sorry, I'm just a girl but a bit of a frustrated carpenter myself!)... Keep it coming!

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    1. Thanks for the comment and I hope you continue to follow my blog.
      In answer to your question the rafters next to the wall aren't normally placed touching it, they are normally spaced around 50mm (2") away. This is so the timber can breathe (a roof aways has to be vented). thats why it's tricky getting the first few rafters up as they have to self support each other. The rafters are then just fixed to the wall plate and the ridge beam. To tie the roof to the house we then add metal L shaped straps that span across 3 rafters and fix to the wall, we also tie the new gable to the roof this way only the stone mason will build them in as he goes. Hope this answers your question and if you've got any more dont hessiate to ask.
      Kev

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  2. Hey Kev! Putting up roof trusses is indeed a daunting task. In fact, the most challenging work here is to determine the angle at which to cut the pieces to form a perfect triangular frame. Come to think of it, it would be easier to do that with a partner. You’ve done a great job, though!

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    1. Hi Elizabeth, luckily I did work with another chippy on this job (and we've got a few more to do together yet) and this was a cut roof not trusses (trusses come ready made). The angles aren't too bad to work out but it's always best to cut a couple of test rafters first to make sure it's right before you cut the rest!
      Thanks for your comment and for stopping by.
      Kev

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  3. Hi kev how long did it take you to do the roof ? 4 -6 weeks . Chris sparky x good blog kid

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  4. Great work it seems amazing.I like the design you made.

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  5. “In the UK we describe a cut roof as one you build from scratch, not using preformed trusses.” – Wow. Good job, Kev! That’s quite impressive. How has it been since you finished your roofing project? It would be interesting to have another blog post about it, we’re curious! :)

    Santo Caridine

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    1. Hi Santo - Thanks for the comment. We've been waiting for the stonework to be finished before we can slate it, but I will post a picture when it's all done (there's an arched door to go on it as well whihc should be interesting)

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    2. Judging by the pictures, the measurements were precisely calculated. What values did you have for the 40 degree pitch of the roof? Congratulations, Kev, and to the rest of the crew! Your efforts really paid off. :)

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  6. You probably feel fulfilled. After all, you started the roof project from scratch, and you saw it to the end. You even did the trusses for it! Good job indeed!

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