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Sunday, 28 October 2012

Building A Stud Wall Step By Step

Here's a step by step guide of how I installed a stud wall for a customer yesterday. This is going to make a large walk-in wardrobe with long length shelves and rails
Setting out. Always tricky in a old house. In the end I went square off the wall with the window as it looked right.


The outside frame up. It's essential to get this level. Cut the uprights long enough to wedge the head and sole plate in place.
I screwed these in but I also used a grab adhesive to stick them to the walls, floor and ceiling


Next add the studs that will form the door opening.
Make the opening a couple of mm bigger than the frame you're going to fit

Add the other studs. so that no spacing is wider than 400mm (16").
Also cut out the sole plate where the door is.


Add noggins at to carry the plasterboard joint (1.2m).
Also add the head to the door and an upright to carry the plasterboard

Here I've added extra noggins as I know I've got to fit a large shelve and hanging rail later

Extra noggins give you a solid fixing later in a job


Plasterboard one side of the stud wall


Plasterboard the other side, making sure no screws are left sticking out
(you can add insulating between for sound proofing if you want to)


Add your door lining- take your time with this and make sure it's plumb and not in twist - it will make hanging the door much easier later. This was a hardwood door linning so I countersunk all the screws to accept hardwood pellets to hide the screw heads.
That's as far as I can go for now.
Now I've just got to wait for Sean the plasterer to come and then I can finish off all the trim work (architrave, skirting), hang the door and then add all the shelves and rails that the customer wants.

12 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Cheers Brian - I even hoovered up at the end!

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  2. You do nice work and make it all seem so simple. I am a terrible carpenter who always measures things incorrectly.

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    Replies
    1. Cheers for the comment. Always take your time and your find it much easier - the old saying of measure twice cut once is pretty accurate!

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  3. might be a silly question, (it's that daft woman again) but did you take the carpet out from under all of the soleplate, or just the door bit? I imagine you probably did, but it's not obvious from the photos.

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    1. Not a silly question at all. I did cut the carpet out from under the soleplate so I could fix and glue it properly to the floor. Luckily there was a join there anyway so it made it easier. In hindsight I probably would have just rolled it back where the door is to save having a second joint in it but with carpet tape you won't even be able to tell. Thanks for your comment. Kev

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  4. Ag! I feel like I'm left hanging! I currently have door openings (for a closet) that is finished (drywall, texture, etc)... the openings are similar to the 2nd to the last photo in this post. I'm trying to figure out how to add door casing, a "reveal" (whatever that is!) etc, which is how I ended up on this post, which is why I feel like I'm left hanging! :) How did you finish the door?

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  5. Ag! I feel like I'm left hanging! I currently have door openings (for a closet) that is finished (drywall, texture, etc)... the openings are similar to the 2nd to the last photo in this post. I'm trying to figure out how to add door casing, a "reveal" (whatever that is!) etc, which is how I ended up on this post, which is why I feel like I'm left hanging! :) How did you finish the door?

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  6. I also have an old house without a straight wall or a right angle in it. So I just pick one wall and square off that? I've been trying to square it at both ends to the walls. And getting myself frustrated. The 345 thing works at one end but not the other. So I just go with one correct side? Have I been over thinking this whole thing? Gah.
    Great post. I'll be referring to this A LOT! And the one where you put the shelves in. Thanks.

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    1. Sometimes you have to just go with what looks right in an old house. Sometimes square and Level just don't look right! Maybe doing what we call half and half where you just split the difference and see what that looms like?

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    2. Thank you Kev. I have one long wall and the other is short and turns a corner. I'll get it square to the long wall as that's going to be the most noticeable. It's actually just like the room shape you have here. If it looks half as good as yours I'll be very happy.

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    3. Pop by my blog and see how mine is turning out Kev. I ran into a big problem...

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